Dub Reality
Indigenous Resistance

Sep
09

This is a double-sided release, consisting of an e-book and a soundtrack. 
Inside the 200+ pages e-book are words of WisDub from Assata Shakur, John Trudell, Douglas Cardinal, Dr. Butch Bilal Ware and the late Jean”Binta” Breeze. 
At the center of IR 60 is a dialogue on 
• the pre-colonial histories of anarchist Africa • the Black anarchists who fought in the Spanish Civil War against fascism • the legacies of Canute Frankson, Bhagat Singh, Pandurang Khankhoje, and other figures of outernationalist resistance • the confluence of political and spiritual dub in the visionary lives of Ho Chi Minh and Emir Abdelkadez 

This is a video trailer IR made for the book which is set to the track ” Krikati Empowerment Mix ” featuring the Indigenous Krikati people and Underground Resistance (UR)

The majority of images in this video trailer are taken from the IR 60 Indigenous And Black WisDub e book.

This other new video is a visual re-magining of one of the tracks found on the soundtrack for the IR60 book.The video is entitled :

It is available on Bandcamp on the Indigenous Resistance page https6://tinyurl.com/y4z9fjh2 This clip was filmed with a phone at Senene ,Uganda by Timo and features two members of IR :: Sankara Future Dub Resurgence :Kabaka Labartin Klacity and Ras Charles. This is a raw unedited clip but IR loved the rawness and quiet militant dub vibe.And yes, that is a Jacques Derrida quote “We always return to water ” that that is on the Dubzaine designed t shirt worn by Kabaka. This quote by the Algerian born philospher was taken from an anti colonialism piece he wrote.

Kabaka Labartin Klacity . Photo taken by “Lake Naluubale “

There is another codified signpost as Kabaka last words in the video are ” The words of Bilal Ware break the Silence”
The words in this video are a reflection of the process when Vision meets Dub Architecture .


The soundtrack album plus two versions of the e – book

Iis available on the Indigenous Resistance Bandcamp page https://tinyurl.com/y4z9fjh2

These are the lyrics from one of the tracks on the IR60 soundtrack album . The track is entitled
Anarchist Africa

” sometimes its necessary to question the paradigms that have been implanted in our minds so we ask you to be pensive asp opposed to defensive

those who seek to reclaim our African glory  

so often  put centralised  african kingdoms like kemet   mali kush at the center of their story

name checking kings and queens to add to the sheen 
but Africa was more than those

anarchist examples more common than we suppose


in fact these centralised kingdoms were a minority 
instead  we can look at the igbo

a federation of autonomous communities without kings queens chiefs

don’t shake your head in disbelief
at one point  4 million peopleorganised into  2000 separate villages 
should the presence and existence of a Kingdom, empire, nation or  state radiating immense material wealth 

be the yardstick we use to contemplate our self worth  for this time we spend on earth 
are we not detracting from those who did not choose to chase that particular vision of glory?
Are we not detracting from African indigenous peoples

who chose instead to humbly respect and flow with the earth 

acting as caregivers of this land  on which we stand!
Many will acknowledge on our African continent

we live within  imposed colonial boundaries artificial state constructs 

Geographic lines drawn by others

which interfere with people’s lives while simultaneously being a constant cause of strife 
most African peoples were stateless prior to colonialism.

this stateless presence often referred to as a sign of  our so-called underdevelopment a barometer of lower intelligence

but what if it was a conscious rejection of

Kingdoms, empires, nations, states and other political forms of centralized hierarchy
refusing to live a life of subjugation 

insisting on African mutual aid

created by those unafraid  of social living,   communal living. 

Peoples likeThe Shona of Zimbabwe, the Mano of  Ivory Coast,the Kusaasi of Ghana,those of the highlands of Madgascar and other African peoples with anti-authoritarian philosophies of living together

yes indeed time to reshape the historical algorithm  

do your on research 

reach your own conclusion

and always be ready to shatter any illusions
as we challenge the framework 

we ask you to be pensive as opposed to being  defensive
sometimes its necessary to question they paradigms that have been implanted in our minds”

Feb
14

Now available on Bandcamp !The new album by IR:Sankara Future Dub Resurgence entitled

Rising Up For The Dub World Within .You can get the album on the Bandcamp page for Indigenous Resistance

The album cover is designed by Dubzaine.

This is the tracklisting:

1 anarchist africa
2 colombia n21
3 standing rock future dub
4 women hold up half the  sky ( track labelled as Sky)
5 when Visions fall from Sky 
6 fire
7 our cultivation
8 iwa pele 
9 endgames live african funk
10 two thousand season dub

11 east wadada flute

 12 When Silence Rises from Earth: 4’33” * An African Ceremony for an Anti-colonial Future (More Than Cage Imagined Mix)

Bonus tracks

13 Revolution Dub

14 Anarchist Africas

15 Black panther party Free breakfast program

16 zoonotic

album cover designs by Dubzaine

Bonus artwork 7 posters by Dubzaine for those who purchase the entire album on Bandcamp

Some of the posters will be the following:

Nov
12

Anarchist Afreeka”.

Since the words for the musical track “Anarchist Africa” by IR:Sankara Future Dub Resurgence are so important we are presenting them on this post.The track “Anarchist Africa“can be found here on BANDCAMP .It is found on an Ep that features the collective collaborative efforts of IR::Sankara Future Dub Resurgence in Uganda, Dhangsha, Herman”Soy Sos ” Pearl, The Professor Of Dub and others in the Shadows.

The following are the lyrics for the track Anarchist Africa

“Sometimes its necessary to question.
the paradigms that have been implanted in our minds
so we ask you to be pensive
as opposed to defensive
those who seek to reclaim our African glory
so often put
centralised african kingdoms
like kemet mali kush
at the center of their story
name checking kings and queens
to add to the sheen

but Africa was more than those
anarchist examples more common than we suppose

A Dubzaine design

in fact
these centralised kingdoms were a minority

instead we can look at the igbo
a federation of autonomous communities
without kings queens chiefs
don’t shake your head in disbelief

at one point 4 million people
organised into 2000 separate villages

should the presence and existence of a
Kingdom, empire, nation or state
radiating immense material wealth
be the yardstick we use to contemplate
our self worth
for this time we spend on earth

are we not detracting from those who did not choose to chase that
particular vision of glory?

Are we not detracting from African indigenous peoples
who chose instead to humbly respect and flow with the earth
acting as caregivers of this land
on which we stand!

Many will acknowledge on our African continent
we live within imposed colonial boundaries
artificial state constructs
Geographic lines drawn by others
which interfere with people’s lives
while simultaneously
being a constant cause of strife

Dubzaine design

most African peoples were stateless prior to colonialism.
this stateless presence
often referred to as a sign of our so-called underdevelopment
a barometer of lower intelligence
but what if it was a conscious rejection of
Kingdoms, empires, nations, states,
And other political forms of centralized hierarchy

refusing to live a life of subjugation
insisting on African mutual aid
created by those unafraid
of social living,
communal living.

Peoples like
The Shona of Zimbabwe,
the Mano of Ivory Coast,
the Kusaasi of Ghana,
those of the highlands of Madgascar
and other African peoples
with anti-authoritarian philosophies of living together

yes indeed time to reshape the historical algorithm
do your on research
reach your own conclusion
and always be ready to shatter any illusions

as we challenge the framework
we ask you to be pensive
as opposed to being defensive

sometimes its necessary to question
the paradigms that have been implanted in our minds

Nov
01

Anarchist Africa:When Visions Fall From Sky. A new IR::Sankara Future Dub Resurgence Release

Based in Uganda, the musicians IR::Sankara Future Dub Resurgence like to describe their music as “Future Dub.” They take elements of noise, non-metric riddims, experimental electronics, dub reggae and dub poetry, and djembe and nyabinghi drumming together to create the unexpected.

You can purchase the album here on Bandcamp

The opening lyrics to “Anarchist Africa” set up the critical, yet self-reflective, mindset of this mini-album.You can get

Sometimes it’s necessary to question    

the paradigms that have been implanted in our minds.

So we ask you to be pensive

as opposed to defensive.

Lyrically, these tracks aim to challenge our political and cultural concepts, especially of the African subcontinent and its colonial as well as pre-colonial histories.

Those who seek to reclaim our African glory  

so often put 

centralised African kingdoms

like Kemet, Mali, Kush 

at the center of their story

name-checking kings and queens

to add to the sheen

But Africa was more than those anarchist examples,

more common than we suppose.

In fact, 

these centralised kingdoms were a minority

Design by Dubzaine

“Anarchist Africa” also addresses the history of indigenous people in Africa and how their lives and contributions have been evaluated.

Are we not detracting from African indigenous peoples

who chose instead to humbly respect and flow with the earth 

acting as caregivers of this land 

on which we stand?

Africa’s anarchist and anti-authoritarian traditions are presented on this track to give a radically different perspective of the continent’s political story.

The track “When Visions Fall From Sky” pays homage to African ancestral practices, emphasizing the mystical experience while challenging the grand narratives and stereotypes that have been made (and used against) African peoples throughout modern  history. It utilises bass-heavy voices of dub poetry and jagged, dub-inflected percussion. Together, these elements have the piercing effect of presenting what Sankara Future Dub Resurgence describe as “Our African story” (as opposed to his story):

18th century literacy rates in West Africa

in places like Senegal

were two to three times higher

than any place in Europe at the same time

BOOM!

Plantation records in America 

were often kept by enslaved African Muslims

using African languages written in Arabic script

because the slave owners could not read or write

BOOM!

In 1770, before the French and American revolutions,

There was a revolution in Futa Toro, West Africa 

That not only abolished slavery, but kingsa

BOOM!

They can’t take the book from you 

If you are the book.

The “BOOM” behind each message represents the power of remembering African knowledge-traditions in light of racist, historical erasure. As photographer and musician Aniruddha Das notes, “seldom is there ANY depiction of African people with books or reading.”

This EP was created physically and virtually with the collaborative forces of IR::Sankara Future Dub Resurgence, Herman “Soy Sos “Pearl, Dhangsha, the Professor Of Dub and others in the Shadows.

Lastly, this EP is incomplete without director Joshua Black Alibet’s film visualization of the track “When Visions Fall From Sky.” Filmed on the beautiful Ugandan island of Senene, it uses the natural lighting of the early morning sunrise to create luminous, soft textures. It draws on the subtleties of the colour spectrum in ways that evoke Daughters Of The Dust (1991), a landmark work of African-American cinema in which director Julie Dash handled lighting in ways that caressed its Black protagonists in a beautifully affirming manner. You can watch Alibet’s film here on Vimeo.

https://vimeo.com/473864476

Jul
20
1ED31B82-4783-4EFC-B53F-7C4884399E8D
27D86B39-43C2-4EA6-90AF-9C8AA381BE7A

militant IR session ft SANKARA FUTURE DUB RESURGENCE, DHANGSHA, MAPU & APACHITA. Broadcast 18.07.20 on Raskattas Radio Show.

West Papua Liberation intro.

1 TWO THOUSAND SEASONS DUB

Black Panther Breakfast Club & Anarchism intro.

2. PERFECT BLACK LIGHT

Zoonotic meaning intro.

3. STANDING ROCK FUTURE DUB

4. WOMEN HOLD UP HALF THE SKY

5. FIRE

Intro for Afro Colombians, Indigenous people on the frontlines. Mariela Franco remembrance.

6. COLOMBIA N21

7. DREAMS ARE DUB REALITY

Intro: Dhangsha & Dj Soundar aiding in breaking musical convention.

8 IWA PELE

DUB MUSEUM, KAMPALA, UGANDA

Ras Issacs: flute, djembe, Nyabinghi drums

Kabaka: vox

Ras Kilomo: vox

Esaete: vox

Ras Charles: recording

Jozef Spin: translation

TURTLE ISLAND / CHILE

Mapu: vox, Aztec drums, shakers,

Apachita: vox.

Nico: trucata

Prasonik : wordsmith interventions at 4 am

COLOMBIA

Dub Code II: N21 demo and vox recording

UK

Dhangsha: electronics

Ramjac: mastering

FRANCE

DJ Soundar: sequencing

BRAZIL

Dubdem: Artwork

Brasilian Sistren In The Shadows: Brazilian translation and vocal coaching

Indonesia :Nina vox

LISTEN HERE on soundcloud

2D18AF86-8396-4478-8587-0A68A0E6FF08

Dhangsha wrote some dub reflections on the Radio broadcast that we wanted to share with you:

Sonic Interventions & Indigenous Resistance

“IR Sonic Interventions” was first broadcast on 18th July 2020, on Raskattas Radio, based in Sofia, Bulgaria. It featured Sankara Future Dub Resurgence, Dhangsha and Dub Sisters Mapu, Apachita and Esaete. For those who listened in, it was like an exhilarating live gig – raw in sound and text with punk attitude, but disciplined like a Peoples’ Army on manoeuvres – everyone jumping in to take the baton then passing it on – everyone looking out for everyone else.

This is what happens when sonic experimentation and co-operation moves music and text beyond current convention. The political commentary and degree of analysis demonstrated a depth that is missing from present day dub, but not at the expense of dance propulsion. Bob Marley and his contemporaries created a framework of militant poetry with which to uplift the spirits of oppressed people. But over forty years on, it is not enough to merely REPRODUCE that template.

As Sankara FDR say: “this is no photocopy dub.” Aside from spoken testimonies, the session was comprised of field recordings, acoustic rhythms and melodies and uncompromising programmed sequences. It was assembled using a variety of techniques: post-punk cut & paste, dub mixology and live electronic improvisation. This was in fact an ‘alternative news broadcast,’ unashamedly betraying a robust anti-colonial perspective. It was on THAT level.

For all the Sisters & Brothers out there with open hearts and minds and ready to engage:

WE SEE YOU NOW.

For all those out there who would hinder our ability to breathe – you have revealed yourselves:

WE SEE YOU NOW.

listen to this great interview with Dhangsha

its deep dub

“If you cant be true to yourself how can you be true to anyone else”Dhangsha

talking about being the importance of playing what you believe in  and being true to your musical calling .

The interview  was conducted by TL Mazumdar is called “Divine Destruction with Dr Das” on apple podcast

click on the link below to hear the podcast

For those seeking a deeper context  of the work of Sankara Future Dub Resurgence

we are reproducing here an article written by Prasad Bidaye Phd

that was published in the magazine ” Africa Is A Country ”

African Political Techno: Reverb from Detroit to the Dub Museum

Yes I seek to inspire

Yes I move with guile,

Underground Resistance my style

These lyrics are from the African futuristic track “Wire Cutter” by Sankara Future Dub Resurgence (SFDR), a group of musicians from Uganda, East Africa who have been inspired by the philosophy of the Burkina Faso revolutionary, Thomas Sankara.

With their love of dub and experimental music, they decided to create a futuristic style of music that draws equally on ancient African knowledge.

The video for ”Wire Cutter” video was filmed in Kampala, Uganda. It’s a live recording, but it’s also more than that. ”Wire Cutter” is a piece that calls viewers to look closely and notice the images layered throughout the performance space. It’s also important to take note of the space – the one and only Dub Museum.

For example, when the lyrics mentioned above are heard in the video, the camera zooms in on images of Detroit techno artists Underground Resistance (UR). The shot ends with a close-up of Cornelius Harris, a key member of the group. At another point in the track, where the lyrics state “We only fear fear itself, we only fear the collapse of the imagination”, an image of UR’s founder, Mad Mike, is foregrounded.

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Images of other experimental musicians and socially conscious visionaries are featured in this video, such as Laraaji, Turiya Alice Coltrane, Cedric “Im” Brooks, and Audre Lorde. They coexist alongside photographs of ancestral shrines in Uganda as well as Zar spiritual trance ceremonies in Ethiopia. Lastly, there is a special wall devoted to the West Papua liberation struggle.

The sonic anchor of “Wire Cutter” is as much about sound as it is about dub poetry and powerful visuals. Driving this narrative is an assemblage of minimalistic electronic noise and non-metric rhythms generated by Dhangsha. In between these sounds, one hears deliberate moments of deep meditative silence, raw and at times distorted African dub poetry vocals, and djembe-driven, percussive grooves created by SFDR.

Screen Shot 2019-10-14 at 9.22.47 PM

When the djembe rises to the surface, it reveals acoustic drum patterns that are actually hand -to-skin translations of Dhangsha’s digital rhythms.

This is more than simply a moment of “fusion”. It signals the completion of a musical cycle.

When enslaved Africans were forcibly transported to the Americas, they brought their music with them. During the course of almost five hundred years, this music continued to change in response to the reality of violent oppression and social survival. For future generations, this music symbolized – and continues to symbolize – resistance, creativity, and the triumph of the human spirit.

The evolution of techno from within Detroit’s African-American community is an overlooked chapter in that story of resistance, but in “Wire Cutter”, a critical exchange takes place as this music returns to the African continent and is reunited with a group of African youth who naturally embrace their African ancestral traditions, while looking clearly to the future with an outernational vision.

Aniruddha Das, the creative force behind Dhangsha, explains this cycle further:

“The flow of the same energy between Detroit and Uganda [gets] filtered by the diaspora currently based in Europe, [transforming] pain and searching and yearning into positive vibrations and frequencies and texts of resistance… Another  SFDR track, “Two Thousand Seasons Dub”, really shows how Detroit vibes – specifically UR – are  echoing now in Uganda to create an African political techno. It is also lyrically influenced by the anti-colonialism tome by Ayi Kwei Armah.

The first time I watched “Wire Cutter” and “Perfect Black Light” (also by SFDR), it felt like a work of science fiction, especially because of the setting. When you look at the settings of the videos, you see a community of people at the outer limits. They’re not connected to any scene because they are their own scene, and unlike the club scenes that most of us frequent, this is a scene that people actually live in. It’s not self-conscious. You can’t be self-conscious when you’re trying to get on with the daily routines of everyday life.

The sci-fi sense also comes from the fact that these are African people in settings that are neither metropolitan or rural. Again, they’re at the outer limits where no one – that is, no tourists – are likely to go. And here they are using technology, experimenting with it, having fun, being creative, and it’s obviously for themselves – not for some festival-size crowd or even for the internet. But like I said: outer limits + technology = creativity. And that’s Afro-futurism.

Re wild

Re define

Re design

Thoughts from a Black anarchist mind

From Perfect Black Light”

(Sankofa Future Dub Resurgence)

The world of the Dub Museum, as captured in these two videos, is far removed from the downtown nightclubs, EDM festivals, and other places we usually associate with underground and experimental electronic music. These videos take you deep into the Kireka neighbourhoodin Kampala, the location where the SFDR music was recorded. This is a neighbourhood that has its food market, corner shops, plots where people plant food, a school for the children. A simple place of day-to-day living – of struggle and survival – in this African city.

The manner in which the Dub Museum was created totally independently and autonomously without the support of NGOs or political parties certainly makes it flow with the ideals of Thomas Sankara and beyond.

Filmmaker Eyi Safi in the liner notes to a Sankara Future Dub Resurgence album describes a typical day at the Dub Museum:

“In one corner of the yard people were sitting around a fire that was going, listening to the music that was playing and chatting among themselves. Coming from the speakers one heard the Sankara Future Dub Resurgence track, then a roots reggae track by Gregory Isaacs was put on and this was followed by a heavy instrumental dub track by Augustus Pablo and then experimental beatless noise track from the Dhangsha cassette “Future Tense,” and throughout the evening this musical cycle would be repeated. Different musical styles from roots to experimental noise music played as a soundtrack to daily living as people prepared and cooked food, laughed, chatted and most importantly enjoyed music. Throughout the afternoon and night, various Dhangsha tracks were played…”

During the rehearsals for the filming of the SFDR video, a member of Indigenous Resistance witnessed a beautiful scene in the Dub Museum yard:

An eight-year-old girl, whose mother makes and sells banana pancakes in the space adjoining the yard, was watching rehearsals. People said that she came to rehearsals every day because she just loved the music. The mix for “Perfect Black Light” was put on the sound system speakers that were set up in the yard. Out of the corner of our eye, we saw the little girl start dancing in perfect timing to this experimental music track! Whereas it might be possible that many adults would have difficulty and hesitancy on how to dance to this track, she had no such problem! She found her groove in the music and she was dancing, raptured in own journey with the track!

Not only had the music returned back to the African continent, but it was now passed to the next generation. Or as the Ugandan musicians say in the track “Perfect Black Light”:

In perfect black light

We see the dub seedlings grow

Apachita generation ❨the next generation❩

Jah know

The album by Sankara Future Dub Resurgence is available here on Bandcamp

https://dubreality.bandcamp.com/album/ir-55-sankara-future-dub-resurgence

2019_IR_SANKARA_FUTUREDUB-13_W

A few weeks back IR crew member  Colombian dj ana*analog also presented a set of music on Raskattas radio show

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. Here is set which is entitled ” Caleta Dub”

May
30

IR has just launched a new album “IR54 If Thomas Sankara &Fela Kuti Were Here They Would Say FREE WEST PAPUA” a free album in support of the liberation movement for a free West Papua” it is available for FREE download from the dubdem website here http://www.dubdem.com.br/ir54

The album cover art is by Dubzaine and shows Kabaka Klacity Labartin and Ras Charles from Sankara Future Dub Resurgence alongside Apachita a 13 year old indigenous girl of Aymara and Dine ancestry after she had just finished

clandestine night time postering in support of a Free West Papua.

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One of the tracks on the album is ” Dispacement ” by Ukweli feat Indigenous Resistance & Carlo Ertola.Toronto writer and culturalcritic Prasad Bidaye has this to say about the track:
“I’m really proud of this track by my brother Ukweli and Indigenous Resistance .Imagine a house record that’s beautifully lush and cosmic, but it also addresses the current genocide of indigenous peoples in West Papua at the hands of the Indonesian government. The spoken word goes deeper though and addresses the West Papuan people themselves through the wisdom of myths, metaphors, and medicine. To top it off, this message is accompanied by a sweet vocal sung in Ethiopian Amharic with touches of dub. #Outernationalism

         There are a lot of house records that invoke Africa, but it’s more often than not in a romanticized way. There are very few that invoke indigenous struggles and traditions – 3 Generations Walking is the only one that comes to mind.
    But “Displacement” is probably the FIRST that goes beyond invocation and actually intends to speak to the indigenous people outside of North America, let alone in West Papua. I’m pretty sure that this is historically unprecedented,”

 

Another track on the album is “Two Thousand Seasons Dub” by Sankara Future Resurgence & Dhangsha.This is the lyric video for the track:

The complete album features Dhangsha, Ukweli aka Curtis Smith, Carlo Ertola, Adrian Sherwood, Sun J, King Raab , Sankara Future Dub Resurgence. With tracks mastered by Ramjac, Ron Murphy & Dhangsha.

 

Oct
31

2019_IR55_SANKARA_FUTUREDUB_CARD_1-FRONT

A new four track mini album with over twenty minutes of music available now on Bandcamp here https://dubreality.bandcamp.com/album/ir-55-sankara-future-dub-resurgence

YES I CONSPIRE …YES I MOVE WITH GUILE..

UNDERGROUND RESISTANCE MY STYLE ❞

The album cover designed by Dubdem features Esaete  and one the guardians of Odwa Kabaka Mukasa Kingdom in Uganda.

 

2019_IR55_SANKARA_FUTUREDUB_CARD_2-BACK

Track 1  Wire Cutter (Live Mix)

This track was a completely live improvised performance as Ras Isaac, Ras Charles and Kabaka labartin Klacity flowed alongside an electronic composition created by Dhangsha.
Guided by  the Guardian of the Way & Ancestral spirits they create a live dub mix which not only celebrates music but fully joyously and fearlessly embraces moments of silence. As IR states in one of its art poster “In Silence We Prepare.”Moments of silence are often hallmarks of IR recordings.
Watch the video for this track here at https://vimeo.com/365382167/
Usually in the video some of these moments of silence are marked by images taken by IR of some special spiritual places and ceremonies. For example, the living tree in Eritrea that has a small church with a statue of a Black Mary inside the tree trunk as well as images from traditional Oromo spiritual ceremony taken near Ambo in Ethiopia where IR witnessed women go into trance during zar ceremonies. The moments of silence are alsomarked by the appearance of visuals showing fearless musicians like Dr Das, Detroit techno renegades like Underground Resistance (UR ) and eclectic experimental composer Laraaji.
Joshua BLACK Alibet and Ramjac later added some magic audio

These are the lyrics

As we contemplate
That which is outside
Time and space
This dhangsha track is what we use
To meditate

They attempt to wrap us in barb wire
Confine us
Define us
Stigmatize us

We use our wire cutter
To escape
So we can alter the mindscape

We only fear
the collapse of the imagination
Stagnation
A lack of indignation
At human rights violations

We will never respect borders
They aren’t of our making

Yes I conspire
Yes I seek to inspire
Yes I move with guile
Underground resistance
My style

We only fear
Fear itself
We only fear a collapse of the imagination

We use the wire cutter to reveal
There is life that comes from truth
There is life that comes from truth

Track 2

Perfect Black Light

The video for “Perfect Black Light” is far removed from downtown nightclubs, EDM festivals, and other the places we usually associate with underground and experimental electronic music. Instead, it takes you deep into the kireka neighbourhood in Kampala and the location where the music was recorded. This is a neighbourhood that has its food market ,corner shops ,plots where people plant food ,a school for the children. A simple place of day to day living – struggle and survival – in this African city.
During the rehearsals for the filming of the video IR witnessed a beautiful scene in the yard .In the middle of a conversation with Kabaka about sacred ancestral places around Lake Nalubaale IR caught something out of the corner of our eyes.
An eight year old girl whose mother makes and sells banana pancakes in the space adjoining the yard was watching rehearsals. People told that she came to rehearsals every day she just loved the music.The mix for Perfect Black Light was put on the sound system speakers that was set up in the yard. Out of the corner of our eye we saw the little girl start dancing in perfect timing   to this experimental music track !
In another corner of the yard people were sitting around a fire that going listening to the music that was playing and chatting among themselves.
After the Sankara Future Dub Resurgence track a roots reggae track by Gregory Isaac’s was put on and this was followed by a heavy instrumental dub  track by Augustus Pablo and then a experimental beatless noise track from the Dhangsa cassette “Future Tense ” and throughout the evening this musical cycle would be repeated.Different musical styles from roots to experimental noise music played as a soundtrack to daily living as people prepared and cooked food ,laughed ,chatted and most importantly enjoyed music.

At this vimeo link https://vimeo.com/365383330
You can an watch the video for this track which was filmed at the Dub Museum in Kampala Uganda where this track was recorded.
The video which was directed by Sozi Joesph, cinematography by Patrick Twine and edited by Joshua BLACK Alibet.You will be able to see the humble garage and yard in the Kireki neighbourhood where The musicians from Uganda Ras Isaac,Ras Charles and Kabaka Labartin Klacity recorded vocals and percussion to the fearless electronic noise composition by Dhangsha.
Apachita who is of indigenous Mapuche/Dene ancestry recorded her vocals in Turtle Island and relayed them to Uganda where they were integrated into the mix.

This is the same Apachita that is referred to in the track “Two Thousand Seasons Dub ” when Kabaka at the end of the track says
“Apachita, We See You Now with the dub warrior spirit, Keep it alive Apachita, you are the youngest warrior globally, we recognize your presence down here in Africa, much love and respect, Big up Apachita generation, future dub generation”

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[Apachita the young indigenous warrior of Dene/Mapuche ancestry in center of picture with Kabaka on left  and Ras Charles on right .She was 11 years old at time of this picture and had just finished doing clandestine night time postering in support of the liberation struggle of the indigenous people of West Papua.]

 

Here are the lyrics for the track

Lyrics

Normally when the people want to do a blessing for someone they say
Imagine them covered in white light
But I reflect
But what about black light
A perfect black light
Cuz black is positive and beautiful
With perfect black light
I bless the child so she might do right
In perfect black light
I raise the fist
Defiant silhouette in the night
In perfect black light
I easily find the pathway
To do right
In perfect black light
I see the dub seedlings grow
Apachita generation
Jah know
In the perfect black light
I put on headphones
To listen to black noise
Emphasise the bass
Dhangsha
Epitomes my taste
Re Wild
Re Define
Re Design

Thoughts from a Black anarchist mind

In a perfect black light
Revolution
My ultimate delight
creation is the way
That’s what I say
Deep Underground Beauty
Revealed in a perfect black light

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Track 3 Two Thousand Seasons Dub

As the intro to this track states
“This is future dub for the liberation of the people of West Papua
This is coming to you live from in front of Lake Lake Nalubaale in Uganda .The music is by Dhangsha with dub inspiration from the book” Two Thousand Seasons” by Ayi Kwei Armah . This track is in memory of the indigenous writer ,photographer and publisher Greg Young ing who not only fought against colonialism but always encouraged people to think on future dub while staying connected to ancestral knowledge”

This is a musical lyrical meditation on colonialism past and present which is why the track starts and finishes with reference to the struggle of the indigenous people of West Papua to liberate themselves from modern day Indonesian colonialism .

The poem starts off talking about how colonialists started the practice of using” Black “to describe something evil and then how life got hard and difficult for the original people’s of the land.
The next paragraph talks about those original peoples who collaborated with the colonialists and who in the process gave up their minds and critical thinking but in exchange colonialists let them live.
Maafa is a term referring to the African holocaust when millions of Africans were killed during the slave trade .
We are making the point that in many ways colonialism still exists.
Chagos islands are British colony up to these present times
and just recently in February 2019 the United Nations declared that Britain was colonising the country illegally and must give it up.
Indigenous discolation is a reference to the various indigenous people forced off their land to make way for so called “modernisation projects ”
Then there is a commentary on modern day life where people are turned into zombies trying to rush and fit into the system; a system geared only to destruction.
Then we address the issue of land for African and indigenous people how we had our own land .
Land that was rightfully ours .
Land we didn’t get from trickery, violence or deceit .
But now the irony is some Africans have turned into migrants
risking their lives to cross scorching deserts
some ending up in slave markets in Libya being sold as slaves and then if they manage to escape that drowning at sea trying to cross from Africa to Europe.
So then we say well we always have had our land and we do have our land .A place where we were always welcomed where we could rejuvenate ourselves and be whole.
So then in this modern age we ask where are the people content with the simplicity of their lives .Where are those who are content with silience.
Living their life unhurried by the present.
The last two paragraphs are about the direction we can take
Connecting past and future , the importance of reprocity ..Giving not just taking And having a purpose of life and the importance of the revolt when necessary as we describe it
“The beautiful music of revolt”

We give deep dub thanks to Nina the Indonesian sistren for the translation of “Free West Papua ” that was recorded for the track, the Ethiopian sistren Her△n for the dub she contributed towards this creation and to the author Ayi Kwei Armah who wrote a classic book “Two Thousand Seasons”.You can purchase the book here from the author’s own publishing house :http://stores.bbkwan.com/two-thousand-seasons

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Lyrics For Thousand Seasons Dub

Intro
❝This is future dub for the liberation of the people of West Papua
This is coming to you live from in front of Lake Lake Nalubaale in Uganda .The music is by Dhangsha with dub inspiration from the book” Two Thousand Seasons.”This track is in memory of the indigenous writer ,,photographer and publisher Greg Young ing who not only fought against colonialism but always encouraged people to think on future dub while staying connected to ancestral knowledge”
Two Thousand Seasons Dub

Our very colour the colonialists turned into the name for evil
From this poison there was no rapid wake up

Those who killed their own mind were spared their body
A people deaf to purpose are lost
From maafa to present day Chagos islands
We know the poison still continues

We see you now
Those with
Fidelity to those who spit on you
Dirty with the ash of the oppressors context
A people deaf to purpose are lost
Hurrying on the rush to destruction

Where are the guardians of the way
Where are the people content with the simplicity of their lives
Where are the people at ease with silience
This land is ours

This has always been our land
Where we began
With its sweet waters of welcome
Here we continue to flow from
And it is here we return to
Foundation restoration
Joining earth and sky again
❨ Swahili translation)

Where are the guadians of the way
Where are the people content with the simplicity of their lives
Where are the people at ease with silience
❨Swahili translation❩

A people sure of the past
Unhurried by the present
A future where the unadorned present is cherished

The way is creation
Avoiding the temptation to just become takers
Healers and those who see the future with dub imagination
Are
Called to link memory with prophecy
Called to pass on the truth of our origins
Called on to transmit dub visions of purpose
The way is creation

The beautiful music of revolt

❨ Swahili translation ❩
Apachita, We See You Now with the dub warrior spirit, Keep it alive Apachita, you are the youngest warrior globally, we recognize your presence down here in Africa, much love and respect, Big up Apachita generation, future dub generation.
Last words in track is Nina saying in Indonesian Bahasa
“Free West Papua”
❝TWO THOUSAND SEASONS DUB ❞TRANSLATION BY Josef SPIN.
English And Full Swahili lyrics

Intro
❝This is future dub for the liberation of the people of West Papua
This is coming to you live from in front of Lake Lake Nalubaale in Uganda .The music is by Dhangsha with dub inspiration from the book” Two Thousand Seasons.”This track is in memory of the indigenous writer ,,photographer and publisher Greg Young ing who not only fought against colonialism but always encouraged people to think on future dub while staying connected to ancestral knowledge”
Our very color the colonialists turned into the name for evil
Rangi yetu asili beberu aliigeuza ikawa jina la uovu

Those who killed their own mind were spared their body
Walioangamiza fikira zao walibakishiwa miili yao

A people deaf to purpose are lost, from Maafa to present day Chagos Islands, we know the poison still continues
Viziwi wa lengo ni wapotovu, kutoka Maafa hadi Kisiwa cha Chagos, twajua sumu bado yaendelea

We see you now, those with fidelity to those who spit on you. Dirty with the ash of oppressors context
Twawaona walio na uuminifu kwa wanao tutemea mate. Walichafuka na jivu la muktadha wa myanyasaji.

A people deaf to purpose are lost, hurrying on the rush to destruction
Viziwi wa lengo ni wapotovu, kwenye mbio za uharibifu

Where are the guardians of the way. Where are the people at ease with silence
Wapi walinzi wa njia,
where are the people at ease with the simplicity of their lives
wapi walioridhika na kimya

This has always been our land, where we began with it’s sweet waters of welcome. Here we continue to flow from and it is here we return to foundation restoration, joining earth and sky again
Hii ardhi ni yetu, daima hii ardhi imekua yetu, tulipotangulia na maji matamu ya kukaribisha. Hapa twazidi kutirilika na tumerejea kwenye misingi ya kurudisha upya, kuunganisha ulimwengu na ubingu tena

A people sure of the past, unhurried by the present, a future where the unadorned present is cherished
Waliohakikisha yalio na, wasio na haraka na sasa

Healers and those who see future with dub imagination are called to pass the truth of our origin, called on to link memory with prophesy
the way is creation, avoiding the temptation to just become takers’ ‘Njia ni uumbaji, kuepuka jaribu la kuwa wachukuzi,’)
Waponyaji (Healers…) na wanaoona yajayo na mawazo ya dub, wanaitwa* ili kufunza ukweli wa asili zetu, wanaitwa* kupasha mawazo na kusudi ya dub
The way is creation
Njia ni uumbaji.
Muziki mtamu wa uasi

Apachita, We See You Now with the dub warrior spirit, Keep it alive Apachita, you are the youngest warrior globally, we recognize your presence down here in Africa, much love and respect, Big up Apachita generation, future dub generation.

Last words in track is Nina saying in Indonesian Bahasa
“Free West Papua”
NOTES
*wanaitwa, means “are called”. Kabaka says *walioitwa, meaning “were called”

Track credits

Uganda musicians
Ras Isaacs:percussion
Ras Charles:dj
Vocals :Kabaka labartin Klacity
Guest vocals : Nina from Indonesia
Fearless Electronic noise soundtrack by Dhangsha
Mixed by Dhangsha
Mastered by Ramjac

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Track 4. Revolution Dub

This is the primarily instrumental version of the track Perfect Black Light .This is a musical meeting of the fearless electronic noise compositions of Dhangsha meeting the ancestral knowledge and dub of the Ugandan musicians known as Sankara Future Dub Resurgence.
We urge folks to check out the Dhangsha cassette “Future Tense ”
Available here
dhangsha.bandcamp.com/album/future-tense
Apachita who is of indigenous Mapuche/Dene ancestry recorded her vocals in Turtle Island and relayed them to Uganda where they were integrated into the mix.Dhangsha emphasises her vocal exhorting Revolution with heavy reverb fitting to the dub roots of this track .This is the same Apachita that is referred to in the track “Two Thousand Seasons Dub ” when Kabaka at the end of the track says
“Apachita, We See You Now with the dub warrior spirit, Keep it alive Apachita, you are the youngest warrior globally, we recognize your presence down here in Africa, much love and respect, Big up Apachita generation, future dub generation.”
Mixed by Dhangsha
Mastered by Ramjac
Guest vocals by Apachita
Percussion by Ras Isaac
Uganda sound engineering by Ras Isaac and Ras Charles
Final track mixed by Dhangsha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mar
11

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Una hermana Dub de Eritrea, Mimi Ketelya, nos envió este inspirador comentario acerca del nuevo diseño de IR” “Mientras ella hablaba, él escuchaba en silencio” Su comentario provocó una conversación Dub y pensamientos, así que queremos compartirlo con ustedes ❝Selam, la imagen que publicó hoy me hizo sonreír tan gratamente que tuve que compartirlo. Es tan tan empoderante y simple. Me hizo repensar y corregirme para que mi energía esté limpia y pueda generar confianza cuando hablo. Me recordó mi responsabilidad como mujer también. Doy profundas gracias”❞.
El diseño en realidad surgió porque un miembro masculino de IR que se mueve en las sombras nos envió esta frase. Esto es lo que él escribió: ❝Yo estaba con estas hermanas Dub cuando una de ellas corrió a donde su otra hermana, las dos estaban compartiendo un montón de historias muy interesantes, así que me quedé callado y escuché. Después de un tiempo una de las mujeres se disculpó conmigo y me dijo: “Lo siento, estamos hablando demasiado”. Entonces le dije: “No tienes nada que disculparte, lo que estás hablando es muy Dub y estoy aprendiendo mucho”. Cuando nos íbamos, la misma mujer me dijo: “Gracias, he aprendido mucho de su silencio”❞
De Dr Das: ❛gracias por este mensaje y la historia detrás de la nueva frase de IR “Mientras ella hablaba…” Increíble! Escuchar, en esta sociedad, particularmente en este mundo patriarcal, es tan menospreciado, es considerado como una actividad ‘pasiva’, o incluso un acto de debilidad. En realidad, es empoderar tanto a la persona que es escuchada, como al oyente❜
Desde Tapedave ❝Hombres, silencio cuando las mujeres hablan. Podrían aprender algo❞
Gracias a Dub in The Shadows por la traducción

Mar
10

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This is a new IR design done by Dubdem that was recently posted on our facebook IR ::Indigenous Resistance.
A dub Eritrean sistren Mimi Ketelya wrote us this very inspiring comment about the new IR design .Her comments sparked alot of dub conversation and thoughts so we wanted to share it with you

❝Selam, the picture you posted today made me smile so much i had to repost it. It is so so so so empowering and simple. Made me rethink and correct myself so that my energy is clean and can be trusted when i speak. It reminded me of my responsibility as a woman too. I give deep thanks”❞
The design actually came from an encounter that a male member of IR who moves in the shadows sent to us.This is what he wrote:
❝I was with this dub sistren and she ran into this other dub sistren and the two of them were sharing a lot of very dub stuff
So I just stood quietly and listened .
After some time one of the women apologised to me and said sorry we are talking too much .
I said no you have nothing to apologise for
What you are talking is so dub
I’m learning a lot
When we were departing the same woman said to me
Thank you
I learnt alot from your silence❞

From Dr Das
❛Thank you for this message and the story behind the new IR phrase “As she spoke…” Awesome.To listen, in this society, particuarly this patriarchal world, is so demeaned, considered to be a ‘passive’ activity, or even an act of weakness. Actually, it is empowering to both the person who is listened to, and the listener.❜
From Tapedave
❝Men, Quiet When Women Talk. You Might Learn Something.❞

Feb
08

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IR conspirator Dr Das is about to release a cassette from his new electronic project  Dhangsa.The cassette will be entitled “Sixth Extinction”Dhangsa was referenced in the recent IR mural painted in Bogota ,Colombia by Chite Yarumo.
Dhangsa means “destruction” in Bengali.Dr Das describes Dhangsa as a contemporary twist on rhythm and noise.Dhangsha, aka Dr Das, bassist and co-founder of Asian Dub Foundation, creates minimalist electronica where sparse but heavy, syncopated beats interact with looped noise. His mission is to explore the beauty of repetition, minimalism and fragmentation in sound. It is a return to his roots in experimental rhythm and noise, going back nearly 35 years, which pre-dates his involvement with dub. He uses little more than an Elektron Digitakt sampler/sequencer which is fed through a RAT distortion pedal to emulate the sound of damaged speakers/reverberating windows at a warehouse party/broken transmissions from outer space.
‘Dhangsha’ is Bengali for ‘destruction.’ This music is designed for aliens, outsiders and unconventional thinkers and dancers.
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You can listen to Dr Das being interviewed on SOAS radio  by DJ Isuru Perera – discussing the aesthetics of Noise within electronic and dance music culture and making experimental music for people of colour.You can listen to the interview  on Mixcloud

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IR Brazilian  conspirators Dubdem have launched their new music and art label. The music label started in 2018 but Dubdem has produced cultural music, visual arts, exhibitions, events and books over the last 20 years. Since 1997  has collaborated with  the global collective Indigenous Resistance and their Free Dub project,hich provides  free download of books, music and posters with the focus on indigenous culture from Jamaica, the Americas  and Africa .

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In 2006  Dubdem Sound System started operating , playing gigs in Brazil until 2012. They organised several gigs in memory of the murdered Pataxo warrior Galdino including some events with  Deeder  Zaman the original lead rapper  with Asian Dub Foundation.After a six year pause ,the sound system is back in action, now with a new concept: Dubdem Reggae Live Broadcast.

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Linked since 2012 with Powers Records ; the Jamaican label of Negril´s veteran singjay Karubel, Dubdem Music will work to reveal independent artists from different places of the world, mixing styles and voices, an experimental music journey guided by reggae vibes. Conscious music; rub a dub riddims; resistance messages; positive vibrations; history; indigenous  peoples` cultures  and roots from Jamaica, Brazil, Africa; ancient  philosophy mixed inna contemporary groove; thats the motion, to mix them all inna dubdem style. Check the Dubdem website  http://www.dubdem.com.br for more information about Dubdem projects and downloads.

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The artist Karubel
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The Artist Karubel was born in Trelawney, Jamaica, 1965 and started to sing  from a young age  at school. When he was  18 years old he  decided to be a professional singer and started with the professional name  “Sugar Dee.” “Who gave me dis name was a postman”, says Karubel. In 1988 recorded his first singles with the mighty King Tubby. He also recorded  some songs under the name ” Buzzrock Warrior.”

With three album  on his own label Powers Records (”Memba Dat”, “Put Some Love Inna Your Heart” and “Problems”) Sugar Dee also produced singles in Jamaica and Europe with many singers and musicians like Super Cat, Alley C, Robert Livingstone, Mickey Scoɉ, Sly & Robbie, Bobby Murphy, Ragga Yves, Jah Webb and Luciano. Since 2008 Karubel has been on  tour into Europe and United States and has been working on new productions with independent european reggae labels.

In 2012 he changed artistic name to Karubel begining a new step. At this time started a connection with Brazilian label Dubdem Music, as part of an effort to further spread reggae culture in different places of   the world.  Karabel`s long journey as an independent artist is marked by  perseverance in the face of hardship.His music speaks on the   reality of jamaican ghettosand other struggles in the world, Karubel knows the significance of music for the people, the social impact and responsibility he feels as an artist.His musical creations are guided by positive and critical messages. “I am guided by discipline and loyalty. What makes a great artist, is a clean mind, dedication and conscious lyrics”.

The connection with Dubdem Music is getting stronger. To celebrate this link up in irie style, Powers and Dubdem are providing a new album, a collection of tunes produced over the last 20 years. A special Dubdem crew selection of songs from his three album and some EPs. All  were remastered in 2018, in Brazil by Turbo Mastering. New album and tunes are coming in this new  year!

Dubdem has also been responsible for numerous IR t shirt designs and an important aspect of the new Dubdem label will be they will making some of their dub art designs available as t shirts.Below you can see one of Dubdem designs that were used for The Dub Dub Indigenous Festival held recently in Uganda.

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